Fiilex’s 192-Point LED Calibration Process

Fiilex’s 192-Point LED Calibration Process

Today we’re interviewing Jeff Lee, Ph.D. and head of product development at Fiilex. In this segment, the last in our series, Jeff talks about Fiilex’s LED calibration process.

How does Fiilex maintain consistent light quality across its fixtures?

Jeff Lee:
In order to maintain consistent color quality at all settings all of our fixtures go through extensive color calibration process. That essentially involves taking our fixture, and then, in color space, trying to hit about 192 different targets. And it’s only after we can hit all of those 192 points do our fixtures pass the calibration process.

Why do you have such extensive testing for LED color temperature?

Jeff Lee, Ph.D.

Jeff Lee:
So LEDs inherently are temperature sensitive. As they heat up to due to ambient temperature, or from them just generating energy, their color temperature shifts and their efficiency changes as well. And so the reason we have to do so many calibrations on our fixtures is because we want to compensate for these temperature shifts.

Not only do we have to calibrate the light at startup and at operating temperature and at extreme temperatures—you also have to calibrate and compensate for temperature changes as a function of the intensity. So as you turn your intensity up the LEDs are generating more light, so they get hotter. Because of that the temperature will start to shift and therefore you need to compensate for that.

Why does Fiilex have more color channels?

Jeff Lee:
Having more channels is essentially having more controls. So different colors or groups of different chips in an LED fixture are controlled by channels. There’s a channel that does one color, there’s another channel that does another color. And in the case of Fiilex we typically have at least 6, sometimes up to 12 different channels. And the reason we need so many channels is because we need so many different colors or groups of phosphors and LED chips. And what that does is it gives us a lot more control over the color space.

Do all manufacturers do this kind of detailed calibration?

Jeff Lee:
Not everyone calibrates their LEDs. For those that do, they typically don’t calibrate throughout the entire range. For instance, we need to make sure that our color temperature and hue and all the settings are good—even down to less than one percent intensity. The color calibration process essentially involves hitting different targets in color space. So typically if you’re looking at tungsten to daylight, you’re looking at the black body radiation curve, and you’re trying to hit things along that line. But if you start adding hue then you’re moving sort of normal perpendicular to that curve. And so with the color calibration we’re essentially trying to hit targets around a bounding box, and once we can hit all of those targets around the bounding box, we can essentially hit any color within that box as well.

How are these chips so consistent?

Jeff Lee:
It’s because of calibration. So, one: the chips that we use are really high grade. We manufacture them ourselves. We make our own chips. They are of the highest quality, and so they don’t fatigue over time. Secondly, because of this calibration process, they self-compensate for aging, which would happen if, over time they become less efficient, and they heat up more, we compensate for that.

This has been the final part of our series on the history and tech behind Fiilex. We hope you found it interesting!

2018-08-24T23:40:51+00:00 May 11th, 2018|Tech|